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m.060.mm
12-26-2010, 11:07 AM
I'm tired - google isn't giving me what I need:

For EAS tags (acoustic, RF, electromag, whatever - anything in the 'sticker' category) does the device sweep all in one direction or does it 'scramble' the polarity?

I always forget which does which. Thanks.:grinblunt:

totse
12-27-2010, 01:21 AM
I know quite a lot about EAS but I can't figure out what the heck you're asking. Are you talking about the technical aspects of deactivation? Try to rephrase your question.

m.060.mm
12-27-2010, 07:08 AM
I was really unclear; I meant to ask if the 'device' (used at checkout to deactivate a tag) works by magnetizing the sticker/strips or demagnetizing them and more specifically how you'd go about demagnetizing something consistently.

But yeah. Did some reading, now I'm more concerned with RFID. I've known people to just cut them or peel them off so I never cared how else to deactivate them but I guess they're short circuited via strong pulses at a specific frequency? With source tagging becoming more and more popular - as well as RFID - I'm wondering if a portable version of the traditional way to deactivate them is realistic.

Any thoughts on that?

skygear
12-27-2010, 07:36 AM
I put up some pics of the portable deactivators in one of the stickies ot tools of the trade.... verry practical but you need a bag to carry it in

Shadowz0r
12-27-2010, 08:24 AM
I put up some pics of the portable deactivators in one of the stickies ot tools of the trade.... verry practical but you need a bag to carry it in

ty sky

ShadyLady
12-28-2010, 12:17 AM
Info about tags:

Written by Scumbag.

Part 5 … ANTI - SHOPLIFTING DEVICES

In this section I will discus the features that retail stores use to discourage individuals from stealing their merchandise. I will give a basic guide for these features so that you may have a better understanding of what you are up against if you were to decide to remove items from a store without paying. As always you should take this information and use it as a building block as you search for a greater comprehension of what you need to be successful in Retail Redistribution.

Retail security experts believe the most effective prevention against shoplifting is the use of a combination of tools known as CCTV (Closed-circuit television) and the ‘tag-and alarm’ systems, better known as electronic article surveillance (EAS) systems. Along with good costumer service, security experts will tell you that these security tools are almost unbeatable. This is not altogether true. Armed with the right knowledge and tools, an informed shoplifter may ovoid detection all together while acquiring a substantial quantity of items.

EAS - Electronic Article Surveillance
This is the security system that protects merchandise from shoplifters. Security tags are placed onto the merchandise either on the out side or the inside of the merchandise packaging. These tags are removed or deactivated by the stores employees when the item is purchased. All EAS systems operate the same basic way. A transmitter from one tower sends a signal to a receiver in another tower. These alarm towers are generally placed at the entrance / exit of a store and will sound an alarm when it senses an active tag passing through the surveillance area.

There are several types of electronic article surveillance systems used in retail stores. I will explain the two most commonly used systems. Acousto-magnetic (AM) which is used by the security company Sensormatic or Radio Frequency (RF) used by Check-Point. These are also the two predominate companies that manufacture the alarm towers and security systems for retail stores in North America. These companies will always have their name on top of the tower. This is good to know so that can plan on the right method of removing an item.


Acousto-magnetic systems (Sensormatic)
These tags will have thin strips of metal inside of them that will vibrate when you pass through the alarm towers. The towers will receive the vibration signal from the tag and will activate the alarm. You will find these tags in two different varieties - Soft Or Hard.

A Soft AM Tag... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/softtag.jpg) * ..
These tags are disposable and are deactivated at the register at time of purchase. Because these tags are a soft plastic you can deactivate them by simply bending it or puncturing a small hole through it. Once you have disturbed the thin metal strips inside it will no longer be able to vibrate, therefore making the tag useless. These tags can be placed on the inside of packaging or inside the product itself by the manufacture. This is also know as source tagging. You will always find the AM security soft tag within three inches of a UPC/Barcode.

Hard Tags
There are a few different types of the AM Hard Tag.

Gator Tag ... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/UltraGator.jpg)* .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/GATORTAG.jpg) * ..
You can use a rubber band to remove these tags. By twisting the rudder band around the pin until it pops off. You could also use two pair of pliers by holding onto each side of the flaps by the pin and bending.

Super Tag 3.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/SuperTag.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Tools/vini1.jpg)* ..
These are the latest tags from Sensormatic. At the top of the tag you will see a small hole. This tag uses a hook key to open it. You can find hooks for sale online. {* Vinipooh *} (http://www.zoklet.net/bbs/showpost.php?p=454462&postcount=1)

Super Tag 2.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/sesormatictags.gif) * ..
These tags are an older version of ST3 they will use a magnetic detacher to remove.

Styles / Pencil Tag.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/penciltag.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/Stylus-tag.jpg) * ..
These small tags are removed with a Magnetic detacher.

Clothing Tags.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Checkpoint/RFSoftTag3.png) * ..
Retailers have become crafty at hiding there security tags. These tags are sewn into the garment itself. Always look for tags that say remove after purchase.

Logo / Price Tags.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/storetag2.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/storetag.jpg) * ..
These tags will look like normal tags, but will have a security tag hidden inside.

AM Security Alarm Tower.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/tower2.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Sensormatic/tower1.jpg) * ..


Radio-frequency systems (Checkpoint)
These tags are basically small flat antennas wound in a circular pattern to create a capacitor. The alarm tower will admit a radio signal that will detect an active tag and then sound an alarm. These tags are often mistakenly called RFID tags. Though similar in design there is a huge difference in how the tags operate. There are also two versions of the RF tags Soft and Hard.

A Soft RF Tag.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Checkpoint/RFsoft.jpg) * ..
This is a flat sticker 1˝ inch square. On the back side is the spiral circuit and on the front it could one of several things. Blank, “Please Rewind”, or the more popular UPC/Barcode. If these tags are source tagged you will find it within 3 inches of the barcode. It is hard to remove the stickers because of the strong adhesive. It would be a lot easier to deactivate it. This is done by simply slicing through the sticker. This will make the tag inoperable and ready for removal.

Hard Tags
There are a few different types of the RF Hard Tag.

Dome Tag.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Checkpoint/RFDomeTags.jpg) * ..
A circular tag that uses a Magnetic detacher to remove.

Napoleon Tag.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Checkpoint/RFnapoleontag.jpg) * ..
These small tags are removed with a Magnetic detacher.

Square Tag.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Checkpoint/RFsquare.jpg)* ..
A square tag that uses a Magnetic detacher to remove

Clothing Tags.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Checkpoint/old-navy-security-tag2.jpg) * ..
Retailers have become crafty at hiding there security tags. These tags are sewn into the garment itself.

Logo / Price Tags .. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Checkpoint/RFSoftTag2.jpg) * ..
These tags will look like normal tags, but will have a security tag hidden inside.

RF Security Alarm Tower.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Checkpoint/RFsystems.jpg) * ..


Ink Tags.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/INK/assortedinktags.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/INK/sensormaticinktag3.jpg) * ..
Most communally used on clothing these tags are also called benefit denial tags. They contain special ink capsules, which will damage the item when forcibly removed. The ink is a permanent ink which can not be removed from either the garment or your hands. A lot of these tags will also have built into them a RF or AM security device. They are removed using a magnetic detacher.


Alpha Security ...
Check Point has a separate brand called Alpha Solutions products which utilizes hard plastic boxes called keepers and a wiry device called a spider wrap. They also have an assortment of hard tags, bottle security caps and shelving locking hooks. Alpha has developed their own magnetic detacher called a S3 key that will open every single product they have. What makes them different from the rest of the Security Tags is the will have a 2 Alarm or 3 Alarm built into their products. What this means is … 1) If take the item pass the security towers the alarm in the towers will sound and a separate alarm inside the Alpha product will sound. 2) If you force the Alpha Keeper open or cut a wire on the Spider Wrap an internal alarm will go off. 3) The newest feature is a proximity sensor. If you move the Alpha product beyond a certain boundary an internal alarm will sound.

CD Keeper ....…………. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Alpha/alphacd.jpg) *
Large Keeper ...………. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Alpha/alphacardkeeper.jpg) *
Spider Wrap ..………... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Alpha/3alarmspider.gif) *
Spider Wrap boxed .… * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Alpha/2alarmspiderbox.jpg) *
Hard Tag .………...…... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Alpha/alphacstrap.jpg) *
Security Hook …...…… * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Alpha/securefixtures.jpg) *
Alpha S3 Key …....…… * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Alpha/s3-keys.gif) *


Radio Frequency Identification … RFID.. * Picture (http://www.hueggenberg.com/images/news/alpha-board-1-3-RFID-Label-Leiterplatte.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://www.sfowler.com/investigations/RFID%20Chip.jpg) * ..
These tags are not yet being used in the USA as a security feature in retail stores. RFID tags are semi-smart with a computer chip that holds information, with or without a power source, and an a short or long rang antenna that can send information back to a central processing unit. They are used in the retail industry as a tracking device for inventory tracking from manufacture to distribution centers to the store. It is the box / pallet of items that are tagged not the clothing / items in the box.


Source Tagging …
This is where a disposable anti-theft security tag is placed inside a product at the manufacturing plant before it reaches the retail establishment. The two types of tags most commonly placed with the packaging or on the product itself are Sensormatic rectangular soft tag and Checkpoints square soft tag. * Picture (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/60/RFID_and_magneto-acoustic_tags.JPG) *
The industry standard for tag placement is on the inside of the packaging, within 3 inches of the barcode. Most of the time it will be on the opposite side of the barcode, so once you find the barcode, you will find the tag.

Unfortunately for shoplifters, retailers have been demanding that the manufacture place tags in harder to detect areas, called embedding tags. These tags are placed on the inside of the product itself or in between the layers of cardboard packaging so that they are unlikely to be deactivated by a shoplifter. Tags are sewn into labels of cloths, are placed under the sole of a shoe or inside the battery compartment of electronics items in addition to the hard tags that you might easy find on the outside. Most large retailers now demand to have all of their products source tagged from the manufacture.


CCTV - Closed Circuit Television .. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/dome2.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/cctvDome.jpg) * ..* Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/lproom2.jpg) * ..* Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/monitor.jpg) * ..
A lot of stores have now implemented a camera system so that Loss Prevention can gain a better view of a suspect, record incidents, and not reveal themselves to customers or sales staff on in the store.. Some retailers now use two-man teams in which one person watches the camera system in a secluded room to detect shoplifters and an plain clothed undercover Loss Prevention who will follow the suspect while keeping contact with the camera operator with a two-way radio or cell phone.

Camera systems have been drastically modernized in the last decade. Most systems now record digitally and images are saved on hard drives or disk for permanent record keeping. The systems are constantly recording every action even if no one is viewing the monitors. This allows Loss Prevention to go back and view certain day and times to follow up on any suspicions they may have. It will also allow security to take still shots of suspects faces so they may print it out for a bulletin board or to send the picture to other stores, via email, within the same chain so that they can Be-On-the-Look-Out (BOLO) for the suspect.

The cameras overlooking the cash registers will often have a Point of Sale (POS) recorder. This means that everything being scanned will have two records, one of what the scanner says was scanned and another visual of the actual item. This is to capture fraudulent scans from cashiers or in the case of self check-out scanners, the customer.


Covert Cameras.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/spycam2.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/covert4.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/covert3.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/covert2.jpg) * ..
These cameras are being used more often in stores that have a higher theft then usual. They can be as small as a one inch square, half inch thick with an antenna and only cost a couple of hundred dollars. These cameras can be easily made to look like fixtures or in some cases boxes inside a stockroom and are undetectable by the average employee or customer.

Loss Prevention will statically place covert cameras on the sales floor in an area they call a corral. This is an area next to high theft items that appears to be a ‘Blind Spot’ to an unsuspecting shoplifter. The shoplifter enters the corral (trap) thinking they have privacy to hide an item when in reality their every move is being recorded.


Pan - Tilt - Zoom.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/cctvPTZ.jpg) * ..
These cameras are the top of the line security feature in a CCTV system. They can pan (move left and right), tilt (move up and down), and zoom in or out. Additionally, PTZ domes can rotate 360 degrees and view an object directly below them. They can zoom in onto a suspect clear across a store and are clear enough to read the time off your watch at 50 yards. A camera’s motion can either be remotely controlled with a keyboard or have an auto tracking program. Movement will activate the camera and automatically follow the person without the assistance of Loss Prevention. With just a couple of these cameras Loss prevention can follow a suspect throughout a store with out their knowledge.


Dummy Domes.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/DummyDomes.jpg) * ..
As you may have guessed not all of the camera domes have cameras inside of them. Although they are identical to appearance of domes that do contain cameras, dummy domes do not contain cameras. The dummy domes will be placed in areas that have a low theft item. They are used as a deterrent against shoplifters because they give the appearance of eliminating blind spots. Dummy domes can also be strategically placed to herd shoplifters into a particular location (corral) that may have covert cameras.


Outdoor Cameras .. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/outdoor20camera.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/outdoor2.jpg) * ..
More stores have begun to use an area of outdoor cameras added to their CCTV system to monitor the parking lots, side and back entrances. These cameras have become so advanced, they can not only take a picture of the driver, but some can read a license plate a mile away. The purpose of these cameras is to capture crimes that may take place within a stores parking lot, but also has the added benefit to alert Loss Prevention of foul play such as people searching the area for receipts or drivers left in vehicles, while their accomplice enters the store.


Ceiling Mirrors.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/mirroa.jpg) * ..
Ceiling mirrors allow loss prevention investigators to watch activity in a high theft area without being seen. Some loss prevention departments have been known to use mirrors to increase the range of their camera systems. Ceiling mirrors were once a staple of the Loss Prevention industry. Now ceiling mirrors for the most part have been reduced to convenience stores.


Serial Numbers.. * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/serialnumber1.jpg) * .... * Picture (http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n552/BadIdeas/Zoklet/Cameras/serialnumber2.jpg)* ..
For years serial numbers have been placed on the back of electronics so that customers had a way to keep track of their items in the event of a robbery. Now stores have begun placing the same number on the outside of packaging. At the time of purchase a cashier will record the number into a system data base. The reason behind this is that if you return the item to the store they can verify that the item within the box is the same item on your receipt. Also if you return an item without a receipt they can scan the serial number to see when the item was purchased. This reduces return fraud.


Two-Way Communication
All Loss Prevention departments have some form of two-way communication. This is used by investigators mainly to help two-man teams follow a suspect in conjunction with the CCTV camera system or to summon assistance when apprehending a suspect. Hidden walkie-talkies use to be the commonly used tool, but now days a lot of Loss Prevention personal will use a cell phone with its added ability to capture photos of suspects.


Point of Sale
POS is a form of electronic journal that allows the Loss Prevention investigator to see a transaction at the cash register as it is occurring live. Typically this system is displayed on a computer screen that is linked to the CCTV camera system.


Consent Searches
Consent searches are a tactic that is widely used in law enforcement and Loss Prevention today. By asking a customer to consent to a search of their belongings such as shopping bags and receipts - any illegal search or seizure requirements can be avoided. This process is strictly volunteer and a customer does not have to submit to anyone looking through their belongings and store personal are not aloud under any circumstance to search your body. Consent searches are legally done by warehouse retailers such as Costco and Sam's Club because they have made it a part of the membership agreement. Although a customer may refuse to a search of their purchase the warehouse retailer does retain the right to strip the customer of their membership and issue a verbal trespass. Still you do not have to consent to any search if you don’t want to.
===

m.060.mm
12-28-2010, 10:12 AM
Thanks guys.

I looked through Tools of the Trade (http://www.zoklet.net/bbs/showthread.php?t=97506 if anyone else is interested) as well as Lady's post and I couldn't find a mobile deactivator for rf tags.

I do realize that cutting them is far far easier but with sourcetagging becoming more common and the tags becoming slightly smaller, I'd just assume use something analogous to their equipment rather than chancing it on old fashion.. well.. old fashion.

Thanks for the links though guys - review is fun. I want to make a new s3 key now.

skygear
12-28-2010, 09:02 PM
http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&biw=1277&bih=715&gbv=2&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=handheld+deactivator&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=
http://images.tradekool.com/133722500/Hand-Held-Deactivator.jpghttp://www.retailsecurityworld.co.uk/WebRoot/Store/Shops/es106151_shop/495C/DB32/13E4/F1D6/A9C1/50ED/8971/89B5/HDAR100.pnghttp://www.retailsecurityworld.co.uk/WebRoot/Store/Shops/es106151_shop/4C11/4681/B0D2/2D96/3290/0A0F/1117/73E2/FREEMASTER_TWOM_s.jpghttp://www.gateway-security.com/SiteCollectionImages/Product%20Images/Deactivators/RF%20Hand-Held%20Deactivator.jpg
http://www.intrepidsecurity.com/images/telsecdeac_1.jpghttp://www.detectag.com/images/handscanner.jpghttp://www.freepatentsonline.com/6700489-0-large.jpghttp://www.eastag.com.cn/Images/products/NEW-PRODUCT/DE-A02-AM-Deactivator.jpg

tastay
01-02-2011, 07:14 PM
I was really unclear; I meant to ask if the 'device' (used at checkout to deactivate a tag) works by magnetizing the sticker/strips or demagnetizing them and more specifically how you'd go about demagnetizing something consistently.

But yeah. Did some reading, now I'm more concerned with RFID. I've known people to just cut them or peel them off so I never cared how else to deactivate them but I guess they're short circuited via strong pulses at a specific frequency? With source tagging becoming more and more popular - as well as RFID - I'm wondering if a portable version of the traditional way to deactivate them is realistic.

Any thoughts on that?

two most "popular" tagging solutions are acoustomagnetic (AM - long rectangular tags in plastic) and "radio frequency" (rf, paper stickers with antennas inside).

acoustomagnetic tags work with a bias magnet and two strips of magnetostrictive steel. this means when it is subjected to a high powered alternating magnetic field, produced by the towers, the steel strips oscillate and give off their own resonance after the towers stop emitting. this does not occur if the bias magnet is demagnetized. another solution to this is to "lock" all the internal moving parts in place with a strong enough magnet. a thin hard drive magnet places on an am tag will also prevent it from setting off detectors. the deactivators for am tags demagnetize the bias magnet using a magnetic field.

radiofrequency tags are constructed with a paper sticker backing, a foil antenna, and a separate section of foil in a manner so it forms a low-farad capacitor. when the towers produce an rf field, it is absorbed by the antenna and stored in the capacitor, then re-resonated. these tags are deactivated by shoplifters by cutting or shorting the antenna. they are deactivated in stores by destroying the capacitor by overpowering it - a high-powered rf pulse overpowers the cap and it detunes.

am tags are produced by sensormatic, rf tags are produced by checkpoint.

"rfid" is radio frequency identification. it is commonly confused with eas tags. there is an uprise in rfid tagging *pallets* far before they reach the floor, as well as military supplies. the cost to produce eas tags that give out an id is preventative, and offers no advantage to a business besides knowing what the person is stealing.... and hence is not in deployment. i personally am one of a few to have an rfid tag embedded in my hand. it is much more advanced than a disposable eas tag, and not only resonates back a 125khz pulse, but it "chops" it in a hard-coded manner, describing in binary my personal identifier.

eas tags are "dumb," they provide a binary output - is there an item within tower detection range, or is there not.

as to using a portable deactivator direct from the manufacturer, it doesn't seem too hard to procure given enough cash. i would bet there is a large amount of space taken up by the handle, and that they are intended to be big to prevent use in, well, shoplifting. like how an s3 key can be "chopped" once you know what's actually needed, i think "chopping" a deactivator would be beneficial as well. open one up carefully and peek around, then get rid of any extra plastic. if i got my hands on one, i could likely hook it up to my new oscilloscope and get some data as to the method. it would then be trivial to create an aftermarket deactivator with none of the restrictions on sales. if anybody feels generous, i can give you a drop address to send a deactivator my way and i'll do my best, and even return it in one piece :p

edit: in am tags, the reason the steel oscillates is because its magnetostrictive and changes size when subjected to a proper magnetic field.

StainlessSteal
01-02-2011, 08:34 PM
two most "popular" tagging solutions are acoustomagnetic (AM - long rectangular tags in plastic) and "radio frequency" (rf, paper stickers with antennas inside).

acoustomagnetic tags work with a bias magnet and two strips of magnetostrictive steel. this means when it is subjected to a high powered alternating magnetic field, produced by the towers, the steel strips oscillate and give off their own resonance after the towers stop emitting. this does not occur if the bias magnet is demagnetized. another solution to this is to "lock" all the internal moving parts in place with a strong enough magnet. a thin hard drive magnet places on an am tag will also prevent it from setting off detectors. the deactivators for am tags demagnetize the bias magnet using a magnetic field.

radiofrequency tags are constructed with a paper sticker backing, a foil antenna, and a separate section of foil in a manner so it forms a low-farad capacitor. when the towers produce an rf field, it is absorbed by the antenna and stored in the capacitor, then re-resonated. these tags are deactivated by shoplifters by cutting or shorting the antenna. they are deactivated in stores by destroying the capacitor by overpowering it - a high-powered rf pulse overpowers the cap and it detunes.

am tags are produced by sensormatic, rf tags are produced by checkpoint.

"rfid" is radio frequency identification. it is commonly confused with eas tags. there is an uprise in rfid tagging *pallets* far before they reach the floor, as well as military supplies. the cost to produce eas tags that give out an id is preventative, and offers no advantage to a business besides knowing what the person is stealing.... and hence is not in deployment. i personally am one of a few to have an rfid tag embedded in my hand. it is much more advanced than a disposable eas tag, and not only resonates back a 125khz pulse, but it "chops" it in a hard-coded manner, describing in binary my personal identifier.

eas tags are "dumb," they provide a binary output - is there an item within tower detection range, or is there not.

as to using a portable deactivator direct from the manufacturer, it doesn't seem too hard to procure given enough cash. i would bet there is a large amount of space taken up by the handle, and that they are intended to be big to prevent use in, well, shoplifting. like how an s3 key can be "chopped" once you know what's actually needed, i think "chopping" a deactivator would be beneficial as well. open one up carefully and peek around, then get rid of any extra plastic. if i got my hands on one, i could likely hook it up to my new oscilloscope and get some data as to the method. it would then be trivial to create an aftermarket deactivator with none of the restrictions on sales. if anybody feels generous, i can give you a drop address to send a deactivator my way and i'll do my best, and even return it in one piece :p

edit: in am tags, the reason the steel oscillates is because its magnetostrictive and changes size when subjected to a proper magnetic field.

Tastay - I'm pm'ing you on this. Great coverage of the basic types of EAS and the physical principles behing them, BTW!!!

MS2124
04-28-2011, 09:20 PM
did you get a portable deactivator? where?

MS2124
04-28-2011, 09:34 PM
Tastay - I'm pm'ing you on this. Great coverage of the basic types of EAS and the physical principles behing them, BTW!!!

did you get a portable deactivator?

MS2124
04-28-2011, 09:38 PM
two most "popular" tagging solutions are acoustomagnetic (AM - long rectangular tags in plastic) and "radio frequency" (rf, paper stickers with antennas inside).

acoustomagnetic tags work with a bias magnet and two strips of magnetostrictive steel. this means when it is subjected to a high powered alternating magnetic field, produced by the towers, the steel strips oscillate and give off their own resonance after the towers stop emitting. this does not occur if the bias magnet is demagnetized. another solution to this is to "lock" all the internal moving parts in place with a strong enough magnet. a thin hard drive magnet places on an am tag will also prevent it from setting off detectors. the deactivators for am tags demagnetize the bias magnet using a magnetic field.

radiofrequency tags are constructed with a paper sticker backing, a foil antenna, and a separate section of foil in a manner so it forms a low-farad capacitor. when the towers produce an rf field, it is absorbed by the antenna and stored in the capacitor, then re-resonated. these tags are deactivated by shoplifters by cutting or shorting the antenna. they are deactivated in stores by destroying the capacitor by overpowering it - a high-powered rf pulse overpowers the cap and it detunes.

am tags are produced by sensormatic, rf tags are produced by checkpoint.

"rfid" is radio frequency identification. it is commonly confused with eas tags. there is an uprise in rfid tagging *pallets* far before they reach the floor, as well as military supplies. the cost to produce eas tags that give out an id is preventative, and offers no advantage to a business besides knowing what the person is stealing.... and hence is not in deployment. i personally am one of a few to have an rfid tag embedded in my hand. it is much more advanced than a disposable eas tag, and not only resonates back a 125khz pulse, but it "chops" it in a hard-coded manner, describing in binary my personal identifier.

eas tags are "dumb," they provide a binary output - is there an item within tower detection range, or is there not.

as to using a portable deactivator direct from the manufacturer, it doesn't seem too hard to procure given enough cash. i would bet there is a large amount of space taken up by the handle, and that they are intended to be big to prevent use in, well, shoplifting. like how an s3 key can be "chopped" once you know what's actually needed, i think "chopping" a deactivator would be beneficial as well. open one up carefully and peek around, then get rid of any extra plastic. if i got my hands on one, i could likely hook it up to my new oscilloscope and get some data as to the method. it would then be trivial to create an aftermarket deactivator with none of the restrictions on sales. if anybody feels generous, i can give you a drop address to send a deactivator my way and i'll do my best, and even return it in one piece :p

edit: in am tags, the reason the steel oscillates is because its magnetostrictive and changes size when subjected to a proper magnetic field.
did you get a portable deactivator?
how i know if bags or clohtes has soft tags? I read something about to hide this tags. This kind of tags are very small, like a toothpick