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  #1  
Old 04-02-2012, 08:26 PM
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Default backpacking stoves

Alright, I saw a couple of threads that skirted this topic, but nothing specifically for it: What is the best backpacking stove in your opinion?

For me, its my MSR WhisperLife. Its pretty cheap, indestructible, good performance for the price, and most of all simple. I have had one for 10 years and it has never failed me. Sand, dirt, burnt food, sub-zero temps...it always delivers. Its field serviceable and it will run off anything from white gas to kerosene to unleaded gasoline to bacardi 151 (dont ask how I know that). All around great stove.



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Old 04-03-2012, 09:09 PM
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Arrow Re: backpacking stoves

I've never really used a back packing stove, usually I've been able to find something flammable to get a fire going and prepared my food over that, or I've dug a hole, lined it with tinfoil, and dumped a fire starter in and used that, or made a burner from a couple o' beer can bottoms.

I reckon it's nice to have a good stove, but I'm afraid I couldn't be arsed to carry it, I mean, I've got a lot of other shit to drag along so I'll have to make a compromise or two.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:15 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

Used one of those fold out hexamine stoves for a bit, they burn hot and boil water pretty fast. Plus the fuel, once it's burnt, is gone. So less weight to carry. Along with the small cardboard box they come in lol.

I eventually go some cheap gas burner, but it was too heavy and too many small parts and fucking around to deal with.

Made a beer can stove, never tested it because of the shitty construction(I'll try again using some of the loctite stuff or whatever. Superglue goes hard too fast to get them level).

My current stove is one of those little Trangia's, basically a beer can stove but a bit tougher. The aluminium Trangia pots are what I'm using too, they are light and stuff fits inside of them(I think I have one end of my sleeping bag inside of it, to take up less room). I should get another one, 2 pots are better than 1, then I have something to strain my noodles into so I can keep the water I used to make soup or whatever. I also need to obtain a stand for it and a wind shield, might need to buy some 1mm aluminium sheet and bend something up.
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Old 04-25-2012, 04:24 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

I have had many different stoves over the years.

MSR -XKG EX
MSR -Wisperlite International
MSR -Reactor
Snowpeak -LiteMax Titanium Stove

It depends on what I'm doing, where I'm going, how many people, weather, and food I'm going to consume.

I like the wisperlite for more cooking

boiling things, can't beat the reactor - I also use it as a tent warmer, and for marshmallows, hotdogs, and searing steaks.

XKG EX when I'm Ice climbing hiking for a few days to and from in cold weather.

LiteMax - I keep in my pack as an emergency stove or shorter trips

for flexability, a liquid fuel stove is the best.
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Old 04-29-2012, 05:27 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

For bicycle touring I've only ever used a beer-can stove; space and weight are at a premium, even more so than when backpacking. Also I like making things and experimenting with the design, so this adds an extra level of fun for me. My trips are short (10 days is the longest so far) and fuel is readily available. All I do is heat up tinned meals and cook porridge.

I have an aluminium pot which holds the stove (in an airtight tub), the windshield (a piece of flexible aluminium ducting) and the potstand. The lid functions as a frying pan. I don't know what brand it is; I got it ages ago. It's nothing special, but the whole setup was less than 10 and it works fine.

I've only ever heard good things about the MSR Whisperlite, although I don't have a lot of experience with them; I've used a friend's a couple of times and I would consider getting one myself if I went backpacking.
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Old 05-01-2012, 02:44 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

ANyone looking to get the Whisperlight, invest the money for the Whisperlight Universal.

Last edited by skygear; 05-01-2012 at 05:16 AM.
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Old 05-07-2012, 05:29 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

Quote:
Originally Posted by skygear View Post
ANyone looking to get the Whisperlight, invest the money for the Whisperlight Universal.
I saw those at REI a while back...if my old Whisperlite ever dies, I'll probably be upgrading to a Universal. I'm a pretty big fan of most MSR products.
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:22 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

I was a product tester for cascade designs for a little while. I think they build a solid product too.
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:31 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

I've made a beer can one before, it's cool how professional the flame looks coming out through the hole, like a real stove!

if you've got some coin to drop, here's a cool wood-burning module:

http://biolitestove.com/campstove/ca...view/features/

still on preorder though I don't think it's had a production run yet...

anyone know how this might be generating electricity? I'm thinking it could be a peltier unit, not sure though
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:40 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

I'll be getting one too/
Quote:
Using BioLite's patent-pending thermoelectric technology, BioLite Stoves convert heat to electricity that powers a fan to make the fire ultra-efficient.

Extra electricity can be used to charge small electronics like mobile phones and LED lights.

http://biolitestove.com/campstove/ca...-it-works/#sub
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:51 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

Quote:
Originally Posted by SHARP View Post
I've never really used a back packing stove, usually I've been able to find something flammable to get a fire going and prepared my food over that, or I've dug a hole, lined it with tinfoil, and dumped a fire starter in and used that, or made a burner from a couple o' beer can bottoms.

I reckon it's nice to have a good stove, but I'm afraid I couldn't be arsed to carry it, I mean, I've got a lot of other shit to drag along so I'll have to make a compromise or two.
i'm with you on this 100% i'm hitting the road next month for the summer and did look into getting maybe a trangia or hexamine stove. but even they will take up vital room that i just can't spare and natures stove i've used so many times before so i know where i am with it. i like an excuse to get a little fire going anyway.
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:56 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

"Thermoelectric Generator" sure is a general term... but based on the panel/heatsink construction as well as the power output I'm 99% it's a peltier unit.

It would be pretty easy to make something like this for well under $130; here's a $6 peltier on amazon
Quote:
http://www.google.com/products/catal...MAI#ps-sellers
Peltier cooling modules are solid-state active heat pumps that transfer heat from one side to the other based on the Peltier effect. The PELTIER2 features up to 51.4 watts of heat dissipation. Max power input of 15.4 VDC, 6A.
So theoretically that could produce around 50 watts with a tuned heatsink/fan combo. Slap some more electronic shit to manage voltage and a port.... you should be good to go! I'm not knowledgable with circuits but I imagine it wouldn't really even be a stretch to wire in batteries. If you had a bank of 8 2500maH Ni-MH AA's then you get juice every time you light up the stove, and have plenty available to run gadgets. Might even be able to run a netbook!
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:56 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

Lots of the places I travel to do not allow open fires. State and National parks to be specific. I keep a stove always no matter the travel itinerary just in case. I'll tell you what, in a nice rain, get a fire started... I can stay in my tent, cook and be dry and warm with my stoves.
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Old 05-08-2012, 04:00 AM
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Grin Re: backpacking stoves

Quote:
Originally Posted by SHARP View Post
I reckon it's nice to have a good stove, but I'm afraid I couldn't be arsed to carry it, I mean, I've got a lot of other shit to drag along so I'll have to make a compromise or two.
but how can you go camping without a deluxe portable camping shower tent?!
http://www.amazon.com/Deluxe-Shower-.../dp/B005NK8JR8

srsly though, a beer can stove might be the fix for you- costs nothing, weighs nothing, takes up little space, runs on alcohol. If you really need to cut down you can buy everclear 90%abv for getting hammered in the woods, AND cook your food with it!
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Old 05-08-2012, 04:06 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

Quote:
Originally Posted by moron View Post
"Thermoelectric Generator" sure is a general term... but based on the panel/heatsink construction as well as the power output I'm 99% it's a peltier unit.

It would be pretty easy to make something like this for well under $130; here's a $6 peltier on amazon


So theoretically that could produce around 50 watts with a tuned heatsink/fan combo. Slap some more electronic shit to manage voltage and a port.... you should be good to go! I'm not knowledgable with circuits but I imagine it wouldn't really even be a stretch to wire in batteries. If you had a bank of 8 2500maH Ni-MH AA's then you get juice every time you light up the stove, and have plenty available to run gadgets. Might even be able to run a netbook!
I'm very familiar with the different setups. I just installed a heat exchanger on my truck for a hot water setup. Now when I need to shower off my dive gear I can take a hot shower from whatever water source is available to me.

Different application, similar technology.

back on topic though, yeah - probably not the hardest thing to make, but they put the package together and $130 is right around the right price point for a solar charger OR a stove... But at the price for 1 and getting both, I'm for it.

This is one of the products I want to test and make an educated assessment on.
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Old 05-08-2012, 04:09 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

Quote:
Originally Posted by skygear View Post
Lots of the places I travel to do not allow open fires. State and National parks to be specific. I keep a stove always no matter the travel itinerary just in case. I'll tell you what, in a nice rain, get a fire started... I can stay in my tent, cook and be dry and warm with my stoves.
i don't really do rules so that's never an issue for me.
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Old 05-08-2012, 04:17 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

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but how can you go camping without a deluxe portable camping shower tent?!
http://www.amazon.com/Deluxe-Shower-.../dp/B005NK8JR8

srsly though, a beer can stove might be the fix for you- costs nothing, weighs nothing, takes up little space, runs on alcohol. If you really need to cut down you can buy everclear 90%abv for getting hammered in the woods, AND cook your food with it!
The applications where I need the shower are when I'm Oceanside for a prolonged period of time. My gear cannot be stored in salty water. It heavily decreases the life of all gear. Rinseing all my gear with fresh water was the initial venture. It worked fine with a water can but I eventually stepped it up a few notches and made the water source onboard and went from the radiator to a heat exchanger for the Hot side. Pressure was achieved with an electric motor and boosted with the onboard air system I installed for my airbag suspension.

Remember, you drive up to the "'Trailhead" then hike for whatever period of time you are there. When you return to leave, lots of times you stink, or are in the need of a good washing... Some places have a 'facility' at the trailhead, but most don't.

I have my vehicle setup for expedition mindset. But I also do water sports, fish, camp, hike, mountaineer, climb, etc. so I have geared my stuff accordingly.
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Old 05-08-2012, 04:24 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

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i don't really do rules so that's never an issue for me.
Tell you what, start a fire in a national forest and see where you end up. Not pretty. They cuff you and put you on an ATV and haul ass down the trail to a holding facility that smells like bear piss. Then they hold you there until a transport is arranged for local authorities. Now that they have you, its a weekend and you can't be arraigned until the next business day(monday)...

Its the woods, there Rangers that are there every day. Your chances of an escape are near 0.

Be as rebellious as you want to be in the comfort of familiar surroundings. Get to a place where they are ready for your hiccups, and your ass is grass. They are ready for Unrully wildlife, you really think they wouldn't be able to handle a fire incident. Been there Done that - I have my gear and don't need to go cheap ever again unless I choose to.
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Old 05-08-2012, 08:38 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

I agree with skygear...backpacking is a luxury, not a necessity. Drop a few bucks for good equipment and just live by the rules. My Whisperlite isnt anything to brag about, but I paid like $75 for it, and its lasted me 10+ years of pretty regular use with very little maintenance. Fuel is extremely inexpensive. They run off anything flammable (you could fill a 20 oz bottle with gasoline if you are super cheap).

If you ever get caught with an illegal fire, the fine will be much higher than $75-100. During a fire ban it doesnt take a rocket scientist to find a wood burning fire. Its a federal ticket, so if you dont pay it, your warrant goes out to all 50 states without question. National park rangers write everyone tickets; its kinda like getting pulled over by the highway patrol...you are getting ticketed pretty much no matter what.

I once got a ticket for target shooting on federal land. We were doing everything right (proper targets, picking up brass, being safe, etc) but we were in the wrong place by like 200 yards. $150 ticket. Moral of the story? Play by the rules and your trip will be much more enjoyable.

(Side note: I need to check out the BioLite stove...looks pretty nifty)
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Old 05-08-2012, 01:13 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

i guess i'm lucky we don't have forest fires and shit over here. i will remember that tho if i ever manage to get stateside. i certainly wouldn't need that sorta shit over there. and being a foreigner would prolly make it worse i guess.
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:11 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

We certainly do have forest fires in the UK (which is where you're from IIRC) - don't you remember last spring when loads of homes in Berkshire had to be evacuated? Granted, when wildfires occur they never become the large conflagrations that you see in the US or Australia, and they never could be - we don't really have enough uninterrupted forests/grassland/moorland for fires to spread. Local fires are serious enough, though.

I was listening to a programme on Radio 4 the other day about forest fires in the UK - it predicted that the incidence of forest fires would increase due to climate change bringing drier springs to the UK. They also predicted that this summer in particular would have a high incidence of forest fires - the last fortnight was the only real spate of rain we've had since August.

It also mentioned that the vast, vast majority of fires in the UK are man-made in origin; they almost never occur naturally.
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:15 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

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Originally Posted by ratfrink View Post
We certainly do have forest fires in the UK (which is where you're from IIRC) - don't you remember last spring when loads of homes in Berkshire had to be evacuated? Granted, when wildfires occur they never become the large conflagrations that you see in the US or Australia, and they never could be - we don't really have enough uninterrupted forests/grassland/moorland for fires to spread. Local fires are serious enough, though.

I was listening to a programme on Radio 4 the other day about forest fires in the UK - it predicted that the incidence of forest fires would increase due to climate change bringing drier springs to the UK. They also predicted that this summer in particular would have a high incidence of forest fires - the last fortnight was the only real spate of rain we've had since August.

It also mentioned that the vast, vast majority of fires in the UK are man-made in origin; they almost never occur naturally.
err no, and i live in berkshire. just shows you how insignificant they are here huh? lol.

like you say any here are just arsonist and they never really take off. not like the scale they have in cali and australia. when i was a kid we used to have proper long hot dry summers and even then you never really got them.
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:23 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

I would say, don't use one.

I did a 200 mile hike to the Devonshire coast, and took a stove with me. I used it once, and wished I didn't because all I did was scramble some eggs and it was a proper fucking hassle. Maybe if I was staying in proper campsites, but given I was just pitching up in farmer's fields, I never really had the facilities to mean it wasn't an enormous hassle.

They're quite small, but as any backpacker will know that doesn't matter. In the space taken up by my cooking pan, stove and gas canister, I could have packed a lot more shit. I could, for example, have fit all my food into my backpack rather than carrying around shit in my arms for 20 miles a day.

Don't bother with it. Cold food works just fine. You can eat seeds, grain products like bread or dry cereal, fruit and berries, chocolate, cheap cakes from the supermarket. You might have an issue with complete proteins for a long trip, but I just made sure I was drinking a reasonable amount of long-life soy milk which provided all that, plus calcium and everything considering it's fortified (as are many cereals).

I did enjoy eating my eggs, and would have liked some baked beans on occasion, but it really was not worth the hassle. Washing up in the disabled toilet of a library, lugging the shit around, and cooking it all in a shitty pan was just fucking wank.

Take cold food, appreciate the extra bag room, don't waste the 15-20 on cooking gear. If you want something warm now and again, you could just buy a little something cooked.
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:35 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

i'm heading down to cornwall for the summer next month, so i'll be the same. all i'm gonna take is some small pans and a roll of foil tho. gonna just camp up somewhere quiet at night. i intend to do a lot of fishing and will be living on the catch as much as poss but obviously will also buy a bit from stores.

as for washing up in toilets, you're doing it wrong mate. sand and a little water makes an awesome scourer and gets pans brilliantly clean in no time. even gets rid of the grease and everything. just get a load of sand in there, rinse it around like your panning for gold or something, rinse and repeat a few times.
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:36 PM
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Oh bollocks you don't remember. The fires were in the news every day for a week.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-13264201
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-13277087
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-13292400

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13265564
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...lands-13264463
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-norther...-west-13250486
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england...shire-13261240

If you're talking about the famous summer of 76, yes, there were a lot of fires that year. Hurn Forest burnt down; you can see the effects to this day.

I wouldn't say that they are insignificant; they mightn't kill anybody, but they're still very significant to the people that live in the local area.

The crux of the matter is that it's pretty easy to accidentally start a wildfire, even in the UK.
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:47 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

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Originally Posted by ratfrink View Post
Oh bollocks you don't remember. The fires were in the news every day for a week.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-13264201
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-13277087
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-13292400

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13265564
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...lands-13264463
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-norther...-west-13250486
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england...shire-13261240

If you're talking about the famous summer of 76, yes, there were a lot of fires that year. Hurn Forest burnt down; you can see the effects to this day.

I wouldn't say that they are insignificant; they mightn't kill anybody, but they're still very significant to the people that live in the local area.

The crux of the matter is that it's pretty easy to accidentally start a wildfire, even in the UK.
lol, that's like 7/8 miles from me but no, i swear i don't remember that. sounds like kids set light to a cornfield, specially reading a nearby school got evacuated. they were prolly bored on their lunch break.

and yeah it is easy to start a forest fire from a campfire. if you're a fucking idiot. no offense mate, but it don't take two brain cells to think 'ok, i won't light the fire under those dead trees with all that dry grass around it'.
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Old 05-09-2012, 04:39 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

@Communicate
All the survival shows say it, and you even eluded to it too. -"theres nothing like a little fire as a moral booster"

I have been camping and backpacking since I was a child. Your methods for transportation are definitely ammeter. The first part of backpacking is only pack the necessities. 2 is having the right size pack for the period of time you expect to be gone.

We need an updated "Whats in your Pack" thread.

I keep an Alpine Bivy/ or tent or both, sleeping bag, stove and fuel inside a pot, fork-knife-spoon-chopsticks, a few grams of different spices (salt, pepper, garlic, basil, rosemary, saffron, dehydrated onion, etc.), a fire steel, small first aide kit, 1 pair of boxers, 1 pair of socks, 3L water bladder (sometimes 2), Goretex shell, Softshell, Thermarest Sleeping pad, Miox Water Purifier or Mini Works EX Purifier or both,

This is the bulk of it. Then theres extra room for Food and clothes. Most of the time NO CLOTHES - just an extra shirt
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Old 05-09-2012, 04:49 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

Your Pot stove selection should be based on what you want to eat. If its a ton of Ramen and dehydrated foods, then the appropriate setup would be a Boiling setup like a Jetboil, MSR Reactor, or similar. They are similar in size to a 1L nalgene bottle. Thats Fuel, Stove, and pot.

I'm partial to the Reactor. in this instance.

If its gourmet cooking then there are setups that would be much better suited.

I hardly carry electronics anymore when I'm out. I have a nice Garmin handheld, Suunto X10, Cell phone(s) etc... But when I'm out there, I find the only real time to play is when its dark. I know my way around a compass and a map... By the time its dark, I'm ready to get a meal and relax.
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Old 05-09-2012, 08:57 AM
Communicate Communicate is offline
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

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@Communicate
All the survival shows say it, and you even eluded to it too. -"theres nothing like a little fire as a moral booster"

I have been camping and backpacking since I was a child. Your methods for transportation are definitely ammeter. The first part of backpacking is only pack the necessities. 2 is having the right size pack for the period of time you expect to be gone.

We need an updated "Whats in your Pack" thread.

I keep an Alpine Bivy/ or tent or both, sleeping bag, stove and fuel inside a pot, fork-knife-spoon-chopsticks, a few grams of different spices (salt, pepper, garlic, basil, rosemary, saffron, dehydrated onion, etc.), a fire steel, small first aide kit, 1 pair of boxers, 1 pair of socks, 3L water bladder (sometimes 2), Goretex shell, Softshell, Thermarest Sleeping pad, Miox Water Purifier or Mini Works EX Purifier or both,

This is the bulk of it. Then theres extra room for Food and clothes. Most of the time NO CLOTHES - just an extra shirt
Well yeah, it was my first ever so there were some issues.

Still though, I was perfectly happy eating the cold stuff, and I really would have liked the bag room.

A bigger pack was out of the question, given I was walking 20+ miles a day, and I couldn't afford to take less clothes (wear 1 pair, 1 pair in bag) because when you walk that much,with a pack in the heat, you tend to get very sweaty and you need to do everything you can to prevent skin rashes.

If I did the exact same trip now, I'd get rid of all the cooking equipment. Instead, I'd probably pack an extra jumper or something to compensate for the very thin sleeping bag, and way more socks.
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Old 05-09-2012, 09:30 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

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We need an updated "Whats in your Pack" thread.
I was thinking the same thing...I'll probably throw something up tomorrow about this. If I'm feeling motivated, I'll do winter and summer load-outs.

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If you want something warm now and again, you could just buy a little something cooked.
I think we are talking about two different types of backpacking. I was talking about wilderness backpacking, not transient backpacking. This is what most of us are talking about: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backpac...8wilderness%29 Buying a hot meal isnt an option so its either stove or fire. Lots of the time fire is illegal, so its a stove or nothing. Its possible to eat cold meals for weeks straight, but where is the enjoyment in that? Backpacking is supposed to be fun. You can rough it and still have fun. For me, that equals a hot supper when I choose
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Old 05-09-2012, 09:58 AM
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I was thinking the same thing...I'll probably throw something up tomorrow about this. If I'm feeling motivated, I'll do winter and summer load-outs.



I think we are talking about two different types of backpacking. I was talking about wilderness backpacking, not transient backpacking. This is what most of us are talking about: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backpac...8wilderness%29 Buying a hot meal isnt an option so its either stove or fire. Lots of the time fire is illegal, so its a stove or nothing. Its possible to eat cold meals for weeks straight, but where is the enjoyment in that? Backpacking is supposed to be fun. You can rough it and still have fun. For me, that equals a hot supper when I choose
It's not fun to eat cold, but it is cheap and easy and it gives you much more freedom with what to pack. The fun, or rather ultimate appreciation, of a trip shouldn't come from what you're consuming IMO.
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:23 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

https://www.zoklet.net/bbs/showthread.php?t=143932

@Communicate - list out your gear. Or pics, or both. Include as much brand name and detail as possible.

All the stuff I listed fits in a 22L pack (about a normal school Backpack size)

My theory here is you are using inexpensive off the shelf regular gear. Not actual "Backpacking" gear. Most of my choices in gear are for Ultra-Light backpacking.

Materials include, titanium, nylon, goose-down, aluminum, teflon, high strength plastics, etc.

I normally do not pack cans, I want beans? I cook them from scratch... Boiled eggs are a great meal/ snack, plus when hiking your body wants salt! add salt on your eggs... Popcorn is a must for me too. Want rice? mashed potatoes? grits? oatmeal? couscous? mac n cheese? augratin potatoes? Meats? Milk? Eggs?... - Dried goods keep for a long time!

check these guys out.
http://beprepared.com/category.asp_Q_c_E_80

Pasta and sauce...

The list goes on for foods. The key here is to make meals with them before you go. That way you can test the meals and your body gets used to them. Getting dehydrated and diarrhea is a life our death situation when there is no water around.

I personally work the ingredients into my normal everyday meals. Another tactic is planning out the meals. portioning them out to fill yourself in separate zip-lock baggies.

Like bacon? Well thats one of the great foods for backpacking that people forget about. It is a meat, salty, greasy, and once cooked crispy - keeps for days! after I cook bacon, I save the grease for my other meals. Again, cook at the house to get an idea of proper storage containers/ bags for the foods and bi products they produce i.e.. left overs.

Another trick for bacon to assist in the cooking and eating process is to cut the bacon into 1/3 strips or 1/4 strips. Cut it while still packaged and then remove it from the cut packaging and portion it in bags then freeze it.
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:38 PM
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yeah, it's all budget stuff.
inevitable part of being on a budget.
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Old 05-09-2012, 03:11 PM
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my sleeping bag is the size of a water bottle
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Old 05-09-2012, 03:36 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

Heres a great site for food too
http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrating-meat.html
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Old 05-09-2012, 04:19 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

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yeah, it's all budget stuff.
inevitable part of being on a budget.
well everybody has a budget...some bigger than others. You can still find quality gear for good prices if you look around a little. For a lot of equipment/apparel, I like to buy the previous year's model. End of season and off season are good times to shop for equipment.

EDIT: It also took me a few years to acquire all my current equipment. You can slowly upgrade and add equipment over several seasons...not too many people run out and drop $1k on one shopping trip

Last edited by roasted; 05-10-2012 at 09:10 AM.
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Old 05-16-2012, 08:38 PM
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but how can you go camping without a deluxe portable camping shower tent?!
http://www.amazon.com/Deluxe-Shower-.../dp/B005NK8JR8
What makes you think I do?

You know, there's a reason I can't be arsed to carry a backpacking stove, I need room for the inflatable pool, folding picnic table w/ 4 chairs, my lawn sized parasol, the mini fridge + generator, the porta-potty, all the potted flowers and the exotic looking palm tree that gives my camp site that "south of equator" feel to it, the 7 bags of pure white sand (with authentic looking plastic sea shells) to spread around the pool, my entire wardrobe as I prefer to change clothes before dinner (one might be out in the wild, but one is still civilized after all), the inflatable king size mattress for my folding bed, the boom blaster playing "378 Original Sounds of Nature" on repeat, the satellite dish and of course the 48" TV...

So as you can see, I don't really have room for a backpacking stove, and anyway, I like to live rough when I go camping, so I don't really need it...
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:03 PM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

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Originally Posted by roasted View Post
I think we are talking about two different types of backpacking. I was talking about wilderness backpacking, not transient backpacking. This is what most of us are talking about: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backpac...8wilderness%29 Buying a hot meal isnt an option so its either stove or fire. Lots of the time fire is illegal, so its a stove or nothing. Its possible to eat cold meals for weeks straight, but where is the enjoyment in that? Backpacking is supposed to be fun. You can rough it and still have fun. For me, that equals a hot supper when I choose
can i just inquire some more about this, as it was mentioned earlier that its illegal to start fires in some american national parks. fire is not only used for cooking but also for keeping warm, is this law a seasonal thing? like just the dry season? ..also what if you're lost and its a bit of an emergency situation. maybe hypothermia or needing to signal. is lighting a fire still illegal then? ..or is it that they would make exceptions in such a circumstance, or that you would just have to accept that getting warm/signaling is more important than the consequence?
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:03 PM
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^^I think they could probably accept fires in an emergency, after all there's no law so important that someone should have to make the choice between death or judicial punishment...

But on the other hand, I won't risk anything for that statement, the US legal system are occasionally (and at best in those instances) a big fucking joke to the rest of us...

No offense to anyone, but sometimes I hear about rulings that makes me facepalm in disbelief, and wish for a better and slightly more fair world to live in...
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Old 05-17-2012, 12:01 AM
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Default Re: backpacking stoves

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..also what if you're lost and its a bit of an emergency situation. maybe hypothermia or needing to signal. is lighting a fire still illegal then? ..or is it that they would make exceptions in such a circumstance, or that you would just have to accept that getting warm/signaling is more important than the consequence?
There's a fuckton of idiots that wander out into nowhere and think they're "fucked" and signal to be rescue, they'd be super pissed you didn't prepare yourself properly. I could definitely see them pressing charges; depends on the person...
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