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Old 08-03-2010, 10:20 PM
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Default The Practicality of Cooking Lobster Over a Campfire (And Other Festival Food)

So, in stark contrast to every festival I've been to, I'm going to one this weekend, and I have a shitload of foodstamps. I can easily blow $200 on food for the festival. Now, to limit this, I'm hitchhiking there, so can't bring too much food, and probably won't have access to much cooking equipment. Let's plan on no cooking equipment.

How about lobster cooked on the coals of a campfire? Maybe with potatoes. What do you like to cook over a campfire? Good festival food?

mike
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Old 08-03-2010, 10:29 PM
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Default Re: The Practicality of Cooking Lobster Over a Campfire (And Other Festival Food)

Will you at least have a pot? If you do, you could carry the lobsters in it and then boil those suckers on the campfire. Last time I went camping I did that with some lobster tails and some crawdads that we caught in a lake. Ate 'em with some melted butter. Damn, that was good.

When I'm camping I usually just like to cook easy shit like rice-a-roni or baked beans.
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Old 08-03-2010, 10:30 PM
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Default Re: The Practicality of Cooking Lobster Over a Campfire (And Other Festival Food)

http://www.zoklet.net/bbs/showthread...orn+on+the+cob
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Old 08-03-2010, 10:32 PM
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Default Re: The Practicality of Cooking Lobster Over a Campfire (And Other Festival Food)

Im usually to broke to bring much and too fucked to cook much so hotdogs and hamburgers are an easy one.
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Old 08-03-2010, 10:35 PM
Euda Euda is offline
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Default Re: The Practicality of Cooking Lobster Over a Campfire (And Other Festival Food)

Frank made a great post about this sort of thing last summer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post
A while ago I typed up a similar guide on totse and figured I'd redo it and some add some pictures of my camping trip yesterday. This is intended for cooking a meal while camping so you don't have to eat basic crap like potato chips and crackers.

First thing you need to consider is preparation. When I go camping a hike is usually involved before getting to the campsite so packing light is important. If you can't fit everything on your back then you've brought too much stuff.

Decide what you want to cook and how you're going to cook it and gather the materials in the most space efficient ways. Don't bring your spice rack, put your seasoning and marinades in freezer baggies. Not only is it less to carry but there's also less of a chance of losing it in the middle of no where. If you plan on cooking veggies bring foil(not the whole roll, just a little more than what you'll need)Any prep work you can do at home, do it. You can peel and cut potatoes and put them in a large mouthed bottle filled with water to prevent browning.



Here I have everything ready to go. The darker brown freezer bag is my marinade for the chicken breasts, the lighter one is olive oil, chopped onions, freshly minced garlic and cayenne pepper for the taters.

Using a screen is the best way to cook on a campfire. I have this fancy contraption that has legs and it's the best way to go. You can get them at camping/outdoor stores and most likely walmart. Not only can use these to cook food but you can also boil water on top of them and dry wet clothes/shoes.



You can always yank the screen out of your grill and set it upon the rocks. Do not place it on logs as they burn and aren't very stable.

When you get to the woods use your redneck refrigerator to keep anything that can spoil at a chilled temperature. Use rocks and create a dam in a place in the river that has a steady current, even though it's in plastic you don't want to set your food in a stagnant pool of bacteria.



You can just set your screen on your fire pit if you'd like but I've found it's easier to create a smaller fire pit next to the one you use for heat and light.



The smaller pit enables you to blow at the entire base of the fire and there's less dust and soot that can fly up on your food. When you're ready to cook, simply extract your best embers from your main fire to the smaller pit and get them red hot by constantly blowing at the base. The embers should be stacked in a position that lets oxygen flow freely and so the embers are inches below the screen.

Drain your thawed meats and place them in the bag with your marinade.

Spray your screen with cooking spray and place your thickest cuts of meat over the hottest spots. The main difference between cooking on a fire and cooking on a grill/stove is the heat is not even. Hot spots move around, the left side of screen might be the hottest part at first and by the end it can be the coldest. Constantly blow on the cooler spots and move your thick cuts along with the hot spots. Protip:Use the longest tongs you can find, short tongs lead to a very hot hand.

Obviously any canned goods can be cooked right in the can. Remove the label and set it on the screen stirring occasionally. If you're short on screen space just set it in the embers but make sure ash doesn't get in.

Any veggies/potatoes/stews should be cooked in your typical boy scout foil packets. Place your cookables in the center of a foil sheet and wrap the sides around. Then take another foil sheet and wrap it around the entire thing for leak security.

(found on google)

These bad boys are best cooked on the grill screen but again, if you're desperate for screen space you can place the packets on embers. Keep an eye on them and flip often. Cheaper foil can burn easily so dish out the extra 50 cents and get some hardcore Reynolds wrap. Covered aluminum foil pans are also great to use. And as everyone knows, fresh corn on the cob can be cooked right in the husk.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euda View Post
Gypsy Bacon can be a great little meal.

Prepare a smoked cured slab of bacon, with the rind still attached, by scoring it in 1 inch square sections down to the rind. Cut off a 3 by 3 inch secton for each person. Skewer it on a long fork or stick and hold it over the fire until the bacon starts to cook and sizzle and the rind shrinks and curls up the bacon sections. Is your mouth watering yet? Sprinkle paprika over bacon, eat by cutting off an inch cube with a knife and topping it with chopped sweet onion and hearty rye bread. Serve with cold beer and Schnapps chasers. The taste is wonderful, good on those cold nights around the campfire.

This type of bacon can be bought at German or Hungarian deli or meat markets. The bacon is firm, not soft. It is cured in a way which permits you to also eat it in thin slices on bread as an appetizer.

If you're buying this bacon from a deli, it's often referred to as "salonna".
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Old 08-04-2010, 08:40 PM
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Default Re: The Practicality of Cooking Lobster Over a Campfire (And Other Festival Food)

Fantastic work! Pakistani corn on the cob will be made this weekend. I just gotta find a grill grate. My girl might be getting a ride up there separately, so she can actually bring a cooler and ice, which expands my possibilities greatly.

I dunno about bringing a pot large enough to boil my lobsters in, but I'll see what I can do. How feasible would it be to simply roast them on the grate? Shit, you can bake them, but all those recipes suggest boiling partially first.

Continue camping recipe ideas!

mike
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Old 08-04-2010, 08:46 PM
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Default Re: The Practicality of Cooking Lobster Over a Campfire (And Other Festival Food)

Also, should wrapping in foil and tossing on the coals work for other veggies, such as potatoes?

I figure tatoes will need a bit longer, though?

mike
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Old 08-04-2010, 09:30 PM
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Default Re: The Practicality of Cooking Lobster Over a Campfire (And Other Festival Food)

Btw, check out this link, it has some fucking awesome simple campfire recipes. Answered my question, which was basically, "Can I take any food, wrap it in foil, and toss it on the coals to yield a good meal?" And, yes, yes I can.

http://eartheasy.com/play_campfire_cooking.htm

mike
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Old 08-05-2010, 01:45 AM
Euda Euda is offline
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Default Re: The Practicality of Cooking Lobster Over a Campfire (And Other Festival Food)

I'll underline that, once in a blue moon, bannock's awesome.

---

I've never eaten/cooked lobster that's been dead for more than like a day. That's why I didn't comment on that aspect.

Last edited by Euda; 08-05-2010 at 01:47 AM.
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